In This Section

  • Key Stage 3

    Year 7

    In Year 7 students will undertake a range of projects that cover different specialist areas of design and technology. They are taught graphic techniques to enable them to effectively communicate their design ideas and are encouraged to be creative in their designs. Students are given many opportunities to use a range of tools, equipment and materials, including smart materials, to realise their ideas and produce functioning outcomes. They also use computer aided design and manufacturing techniques in the development of their products. Students will begin to build a technical vocabulary which they will be able to apply when discussing their work.

    The Year 7 programme is intended to give students relatively brief experiences of working in many different areas within the subject, which they can build on in future.

     Year 8

    In Year 8 students will build on their experiences gained during Year 7. They will learn how to use a wider range of graphic techniques to communicate their designs and they will also develop their knowledge of processes, materials and applications. Through extended project work they will develop a range of skills in using tools and equipment, including CAD/CAM where appropriate, and applying processes to manipulate different materials and produce quality outcomes.

    Year 9

    In Year 9 students continue to build on the skills developed previously and they will begin to undertake project work that reflects the requirements of GCSE courses in design and technology. Further skills and techniques will be taught so that students are fully prepared, enabling them to complete projects to a high standard, produce high quality outcomes and gradually become more independent in product design and realisation.

  • Key Stage 4

    GCSE Design & Technology/ENGINEERING

    Why study D&T or Engineering?
    • The UK needs 31,000 new graduate engineers and designers every year for the next five years to meet industry demand
    • 1.82 million people needed to fill creative jobs by 2030
    • The design and engineering industry is worth £76.9billion a year
    If you are doing maths and science, especially triple science, then you should also consider taking D&T or engineering as a route to higher education. The subjects can help lead into apprenticeships or vocational courses. The course also suit those who are creative or who enjoy designing, making and solving technical problems.
     
    D&T introduces you to a wide range of practical skills, crafts and design processes that will equip you for life outside of school, helping you understand the ever changing technological world in which we live. D&T students will develop skills in designing and making as well as analytical skills, helping them to solve problems and make sense of what surrounds them. Today we live in a world where everything around us is designed and fame and fortune can be found through D&T skills. Think of all the products that make life comfortable, from nice furniture, homes, cars, ready meals and clothes to gadgets like mobile phones, iPods and computers. All these products, and many more, have been designed and made by people who have most likely studied D&T or Engineering.
     
    How do you learn?
    D&T subjects enable youto develop skills in evaluating everyday items, assessing their ‘fitness for purpose’, making them more discriminating consumers. It also develops problem solving and planning skills, essential for being effective employees of the future and dealing with everyday problems.
     
    What are your options?
    Each of the following courses leads to one GCSE qualification. It may be possible to opt for more than one of these subjects if circumstances allow.
    • D&T Electronic Products
    • D&T Graphic Products
    • D&T Resistant Materials
    • Engineering
    D&T Electronic Products
    What areas would you study?
    This course has been designed to enable and encourage students to design and make quality electronic products using a wide range of electronic components to construct circuits, and appropriate materials and manufacturing methods to package the electronic circuit. You will learn how to design electronic systems, design and make your own printed circuit boards, use computer aided design and computer aided manufacture techniques, and design and manufacture quality electronic products such as amplifiers, timers, lighting displays, counting systems and alarms.
     
    Where will this take me post-16?
    This course provides an excellent route into A-level systems and control technology, electronics, product design and diplomas in manufacturing, engineering or product fesign, which could take you to university to study an engineering discipline. It also provides grounding for apprenticeships in engineering construction industries and other technical vocations.
     
    D&T Graphic Products
    What areas would you study?
    This course has been designed to enable and encourage pupils to design and make quality products with creativity and originality using a range of graphic and modelling materials. There will be a wide range of practical activities throughout the course and you will be encouraged to learn and develop skills to be able to use, understand and apply colour and design, to develop spatial concepts and to understand graphic materials and how to manipulate them. You will learn how to use and apply a wide range of drawing, display and presentation methods to produce quality two and three dimensional work. You will design and make products using graphic media and new technologies, including computer aided design and computer aided manufacturing techniques.
     
    Where will this take me post-16?
    This course provides an excellent route into A-level product design and diplomas in manufacturing and product design or engineering, which can lead to degrees in design or architecture. It also provides grounding for apprenticeships in engineering construction industries and other technical vocations.
     
    D&T Resistant Materials
    What areas would you study?
    This course has been designed to enable and encourage pupils to design and make quality products using a range of materials and techniques. There will be a wide range of practical activities available and you will learn through application of skills and the design and development of products. You will gain a working knowledge of woods, metals, plastics and composite materials and the use of ‘smart’ materials. You will also use modern technologies such as computer aided design and manufacture to produce a range of quality products.
     
    Where will this take me post-16?
    This course provides an excellent route into A-level product design and diplomas in manufacturing and product design or engineering, which can lead to degrees in product design, manufacturing or engineering. It also provides grounding for apprenticeships in engineering construction industries and other technical and practical vocations.
     
    Engineering
    What areas would you study?
    This course allows students to develop skills and understanding which will be of use generally and as part of a progressive career path leading to further technical or academic engineering qualifications. The course integrates designing, making and the applications of technologies delivered through a range of tasks, which may include electronics, mechanical or pneumatic elements, or a combination of these areas. There will be a focus on developing skills in engineering drawing and other communication methods, including computer aided design. Candidates will work with metals and plastics using equipment such as engineer’s lathes, milling machine, forge, brazing and welding, as well as modern technologies such as computer aided manufacture to manufacture a range of quality products.
     
    Where will this take me post-16?
    The content can be regarded as a useful introduction for students who intend to continue to engineering or manufacturing and product design diplomas or A-levels, which can lead to degrees in engineering, manufacturing or design. It also provides grounding for apprenticeships in engineering construction industries and other technical and practical vocations.
     
    How are you assessed?
    All D&T subjects are assessed in the same way:
    Examination: 40%; controlled assessment: 60%
     
  • Sixth Form

    A-level Design and Technology: Product Design

    Examination Board: OCR

    Introduction and Structure

    This qualification emphasises two key factors — creativity and sustainability. We want students to explore ideas of originality and value, to question and challenge, to envisage what could be, but equally we need them to achieve the results that will progress their careers. This qualification structure allows students to develop a range of skills and outcomes which demonstrates their creativity and apply these to a design and make project.

    All modern designers have to consider sustainable issues when designing new products. A sign of the modern technological age in which we live is that human actions have had a negative impact on our environment. New products provide solutions rather than add to the existing problems of extractions and use of natural resources, pollution from manufacturing and disposal of large amounts of waste products.

    Good design is vital to our world and economy and this course seeks to develop students’ knowledge, understanding, skills and application for designing products. Product design encompasses a wide range of design disciplines but is firmly rooted in the skills required to design and make high quality products that are fit for purpose, satisfy wants and needs, enhance our day-today lives and, most importantly, give students the opportunity to demonstrate their design and technology capability.

    Unit 1: Portfolio of Creative Skills

    In this unit students are given the opportunity to develop their creative, technical and practical skills through a series of product investigation, design and manufacturing activities. Students will produce one portfolio with three distinct sections which will demonstrate their creativity and flair when investigating, designing and making product(s).

    This unit has been designed to be as flexible as possible, offering students a wide range of valid approaches in producing their portfolio of creative skills. Students are encouraged to be as creative as possible and there are no barriers to choices of product investigation, product design or product manufacture, as long as the work submitted by students targets assessment criteria effectively and at the correct level of response for their abilities.

    Unit 2: Design and Technology in Practice

    In this unit students will develop their knowledge and understanding of a wide range of materials and processes used in the field of Design and Technology. It is important for students, as designers, to learn about materials and processes so that they can develop a greater understanding of how products can be designed and manufactured. Students will also learn about industrial and commercial practices, and the importance of quality checks and the health and safety issues that have to be considered at all times.

    Unit 3: Designing for the Future

    In this unit students will develop their knowledge and understanding of a range of modern design and manufacturing practices and contemporary design issues. The modern designer must have a good working knowledge of the use of ICT and systems and control technology in the design and manufacture of products. They must also be aware of the important contributions of designers from the past which may provide inspiration for future design. It is increasingly important that students develop an awareness of the impact of design and technological activities on the environment. Sustainable product design is a key feature of modern design practices.

    Unit 4: Commercial Design

    In this unit students are given the opportunity to apply the skills they have acquired and developed throughout this course of study, to design and make a product of their choice that comply with the requirements. In order to reach high attainment levels, students must adopt a commercial design approach to their work, reflecting how a professional designer might deal with a design problem and its resolution. A key feature of this unit is that students consider issues related to sustainability and the impact their product may have on the environment. Sustainable issues include materials production and selection, manufacturing processes, use of the product and its disposal/recycling.

    Assessment

    Unit 1 – Portfolio of Creative Skills

    30% of A-level

    This unit is internally set and marked by the centre and externally moderated.

    Unit 2 – Design and Technology in Practice

    20% of A-level

    1 hour 30 minute examination externally set and marked.

    The paper will be a question and answer booklet, consisting of short-answer and extended-writing type questions, all of which are compulsory.

    Unit 3 – Designing for the Future

    20% A-level

    2-hour examination paper externally set and marked.

    The paper will be a question and answer booklet, consisting of short-answer and extended-writing type questions, all of which are compulsory.

    Unit 4 – Commercial Design

    30% of A-level

    This unit is internally set and marked by the centre and externally moderated.

    Students are given the opportunity to design and make a product of their choice. This unit results in the development of an appropriate product supported by a design folder.

    Careers and Progression

    This qualification supports progression into further education, training or employment, such as any appropriate design-related or engineering course. Design based occupations include graphic design, product design, architecture, industrial design, art and interior design with excellent opportunities at degree level. Design and engineering professionals are highly respected and careers in these fields can be highly paid, creative, interesting and rewarding. Designers and engineers are the best placed people to make a difference to society by developing innovative new products, communications, infrastructure and systems.

    Entrance Requirements

    Minimum requirement: 6 GCSEs Grades 9-4 (or equivalent), including Grade 4 or above in English and maths

    Strongly recommended: Grade 5 in maths

    Recommended: Grade 5 in D&T product design and/or engineering

  • Assessment

    KS3

    The framework for assessment uses progress and target statements derived from assessment criteria used for marking GCSE controlled assessment tasks. The reasoning behind this is to aid progression from KS3 to KS4 with the use of familiar assessment criteria. The statements have been developed to be used to assess progress in the areas of design & technology as stated in the National Curriculum for KS3.  There are five areas in which students are assessed:

    Design: writing specifications, including the analysis and application of research

    Design: producing ideas, which assesses a students’ ability to produce creative ideas that match design criteria identified in the specification

    Design: communication, which assesses a student’s ability to use a variety of techniques to effectively communicate their ideas through drawing, text, discussion and CAD

    Making, which assesses a student’s ability to independently select and use tools appropriate to the material and task being undertaken, and to plan and complete a practical outcome to a high standard

    Testing and evaluating, which assesses a student’s ability to analyse their own work and that of others, commenting on how well products or designs meet a set of given criteria and are fit for purpose.

    Through a range of projects undertaken in Years 7, 8 and 9 students will have the opportunity to develop their skills and demonstrate their level of competence. Different projects may have a different focus and therefore progress may not appear to be linear as different skills are developed, demonstrated and assessed at different times throughout each year. The curriculum is designed to enable students to revisit different skills and address their targets in order to make progress.

    Each student will have a record of their attainment, progress and next-step targets.

    Feedback is provided during, and upon completion of tasks, with clear improvement targets being given. Assessment is carried out against a set of criteria, with a project ‘score’ being given. The score is then used to track progress against a flight path that projects expected outcome at KS4 based on KS2 results. By tracking a student’s outcome and achievement across a range of projects and tasks it can be determined whether or not the student’s progress is as expected, above expected or whether they are working towards making expected progress.

    KS4

    Students are given regular written and verbal feedback to aid their progress and development throughout the course. When work is assessed it is done so subjectively using controlled assessment criteria published in the course specification from the examination board. When controlled assessment tasks are undertaken and completed they are assessed using the same criteria, listed below:

    • investigating the design context
    • development of design proposals
    • making
    • testing and evaluating
    • communication

    KS5

    Students are given regular written and verbal feedback to aid their progress and development throughout the course. When work is assessed it is done so subjectively using criteria published in the course specification from the examination board. When coursework tasks are undertaken and completed they are assessed using the same criteria, listed below:

    Unit 1: Product Investigation

    • performance analysis
    • materials and components
    • manufacture
    • quality

    Unit 2: Product design

    • design and development
    • communicate

    Unit 3: Product manufacture

    • production plan
    • making
    • testing

    Unit 4

    • research and analysis
    • product specification
    • design and development
    • planning
    • making
    • testing and evaluating
  • Enrichment

    Graphics trip

    Each year the Design & Technology Department takes Year 10 and 12 students to visit the Science Museum and the Victoria and Albert Museum during the summer term.  The trip is designed to engage students with their project work and with the way they approach their GCSE or A Level projects.  

    Norwich University of the Arts

    Y10, 12 and 13 students visit Norwich University of the Arts.  This gives them an insight into different areas of Art and Design that they could aspire to.

    Engineering Club and STEM activities

    A weekly engineering club for years 7 to 9 gives pupils opportunities to develop their problem solving skills as well as use equipment to complete practical projects.

    There are also competitions which we enter, such as the Smallpeice glider design challenge, which our pupils won in 2016.

    Rotary competition

    The Rotary Club holds an annual technology tournament, in which our students regularly do very well.