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  • Key Stage 3
  • Key Stage 4
    ICT (Core)
    Students will study the European Computer Driving Licence (ECDL) course. The course establishes a firm foundation of ICT knowledge and then builds on the learner’s initial experience and improves their understanding of computer applications including word-processing, spreadsheets and presentation software. The aim of the qualification is to recognise the application of a range of IT user skills and knowledge in the workplace, meeting employer workforce demands.
     
    Computer Science
    Why study Computer Science?
    You should study Computer Science because you are interested in creating applications and in developing the skills and understanding which underpin the creation of your own applications. You should study Computer Science if you can think logically, can work independently and are prepared to put in a lot of hard work.
     
    What areas will I study?
    You will study:
     Fundamentals of algorithms
     Programming
     Fundamentals of data representation
     Computer systems
     Fundamentals of computer networks
     Fundamentals of cyber security
     Ethical, legal and environmental impacts of digital
    technology on wider society, including issues of privacy
     Aspects of software development
     Non-exam assessment
     
    How do you learn?
    This subject content will be taught within a range of realistic contexts based around the major themes within the specification of web, mobile, gaming and more traditional coding systems.
     
    How are you assessed?
    The qualification is split into three components:
     Exam Paper 1 (40% of final grade): Computational thinking, problem solving, code tracing and applied computing as well as theoretical knowledge of computer science from content above.
     Exam Paper 2 (40% of final grade): Theoretical knowledge from content above.
     Non-exam assessment (20% of final grade): A project assesses a student's ability to use the knowledge and skills gained through the course to solve a practical programming problem. Students will be expected to follow a systematic approach to problem solving, consistent with the skills described above.
     
    Where will this take me Post-16?
    There are various courses pupils can follow if they wish to continue studying computer science Post-16. This course can help you to prepare to go into further and higher education. You can study 'A' level Computer Science, vocational courses and on to degree level courses in the areas of Computing, Engineering and Science. The course would be useful for those entering work as well as those who want to carry on with further study.
  • Sixth Form

    Applied ICT (AS / A2 Level)

    Examination Board: OCR

    Introduction and Structure:

    The AS GCE is made up of three mandatory units which form 50% of the A level.  The skills, knowledge and understanding required for the second half of an advanced GCE course are contained in a further three ‘A2’ units. The level of performance expected, therefore, reflects the more demanding Advanced GCE material, including the higher-level concepts and a requirement to draw together knowledge and skills from across the course.

    Applied ICT aims to encourage candidates to develop broad skills, knowledge and understanding of the ICT sector and to prepare candidates for further study or training.

    Unit 040: Using ICT to communicate

    This unit helps candidates to:

    • Understand the characteristics and significance of different types of information;
    • Understand the different methods for communicating information and the technologies that support them;
    • Create original communications in styles that suit the users;
    • Improve the accuracy, readability and presentational quality of communications created;
    • Understand some of the ways organisations present information and why they use standard layouts for documents;
    • Choose and apply standard layouts;
    • Understand the need for standard ways of working;
    • Develop good practice in the use of ICT.

    Candidates will use their presentation knowledge and skills to create a portfolio of different communications, including a presentation on different methods of communicating information and the technologies that support them. They should also compare a collection of standard documents used by organisations. The communications they create and compare need to have sufficient content to enable them to fully demonstrate their presentation knowledge and skills.

    Throughout this unit, the terms communication, presentation, document and report should be taken to mean any appropriate method of communicating information.

    This unit provides the basis for all the other units.

    Unit G041: How organisations use ICT

    This unit helps candidates to:

    • Understand how organisations are structured;
    • Understand how organisations use and exchange information;
    • Evaluate how well ICT can and does help organisations;
    • Consider how ICT supports many different activities in organisations;
    • See how ICT offers new opportunities.

    Candidates study how organisations (including at least one large organisation) collect, disseminate and use information, how they manage the flow of information between sections or departments and the way they use ICT to access and exchange information.

    Unit G042: ICT solutions for individuals and society

    The World Wide Web allows individuals to access information on almost any topic imaginable. This access to information has had a fundamental effect on society and the way individuals live their lives.

    Candidates will produce a presentation of the results of a single investigation, including the use of a spreadsheet to analyse numeric data, along with a report on the sources and methods used to find information and a report that explains the impact of the availability of electronic information, to include:

    • The selection and efficient use of research engines to find information required;
    • Information accessed from large websites and online databases;
    • The use of a local database to find required information;
    • The use of spreadsheet software to analyse numeric data and present results;
    • Different types of data combined to present the results of the investigation;
    • An evaluation of the methods used to find information and present the results;
    • An explanation of the impact of the availability of electronic information on individuals and society.

    Assessment

    Unit 040: Using ICT to communicate

    33% of the AS, 16.67% of total A level

    Coursework – Internally Assessed

    50 marks

    Unit G041: How organisations use ICT

    33% of the AS, 16.67% of total A level

    1 hr 30 mins written paper – Externally Assessed

    100 marks

    A pre-released case study is made available approximately six weeks before the June exam which candidates will use to prepare for section A of the exam. Section B

    Unit G042: ICT solutions for individuals and society

    33% of the AS, 16.67% of total A level

    Coursework – Internally Assessed

    50 marks

    A2 Units are assessed through coursework

    Progression: The Applied ICT course prepares you to enter a variety of ICT or computing degree level courses or for any type of employment where ICT skills are required.       

    Entrance Requirements: Standard entry requirement for entry onto A level programmes of study is 6 GCSEs at grade C or above including a B for Maths and a C for English. Prior study of ICT at GCSE level is very highly recommended.

  • Assessment
  • Enrichment