In This Section

  • Key Stage 3

    Students will be expected to complete extended learning and regular homework tasks based on the topics being taught in lessons, as below. The purpose of these shorter homework tasks in religious studies is to reinforce the skills, knowledge and understanding covered in recent lessons and to provide an opportunity for teacher assessment of students’ learning. They may also be used as an opportunity to extend learning, for example through additional reading or independent research. The format of these homework tasks will depend on the material being taught and the skills being practised. Examples of the type of task set includes questions to answer, posters and power points to produce, research using books and/or the internet, revision for tests, learning the spelling and meaning of technical language etc. Four units are studied in each year. 

    YEAR 7

    • island project including: rites of passage; laws and guidance; leaders; religious books/texts; Celebrations
    • Buddhism including: beginning – Buddha; dharma; 3 universal truths; 4 noble truths; karma; samsara; nirvana
    • special places including: pilgrimage - special journeys; the holy land; Lourdes; haaj
    • the environment including: creation; dominion; recycling/sustainable resources; stewardship; personal responsibility in a wider world

    YEAR 8

    • putting belief into practice including: worship; ethical issues; truth
    • the search for truth including: different types of truth; evidence; the difference between science and religion; miracles
    • religion and the media including: media; Christian response; case studies; God slot; mass communication
    • after life including: heaven; hell; purgatory; original sin; the fall

    YEAR 9

    • science versus religion including: creation; design; first cause theory, evolution
    • religion and conflict including: just war; pacifism; punishment; capital punishment; injustice
    • religion and medicine including: sanctity of life; abortion; cloning; euthanasia; fertility treatment
    • religion and equality including: ethics; stereotyping; prejudice; discrimination; racism; equality
  • Key Stage 4

    GCSE Religious Studies

    Why study religious studies?
    We follow the WJEC/Eduqas GCSE religious studies A which offers students the opportunity for the thematic study of religion and religious responses to fundamental ethical questions of life. This specification is suitable for candidates of any religious persuasion or none and encourages students to:
    • develop their knowledge and understanding of religions and non-religious beliefs, such as atheism and humanism
    • develop their knowledge and understanding of religious beliefs, teachings, practices, and sources of wisdom and authority
    • develop their ability to construct well-argued, well-informed and balanced arguments, demonstrating their depth and breadth of understanding in the subject
    • reflect on and develop their own values, beliefs, and attitudes in light of what they have learnt and contributes to their preparation for adult life in a pluralistic society and global community
    How do you learn?
    Students will be expected to complete extended learning tasks and regular homework tasks based on the topics being taught in lessons. The purpose of these is to reinforce the skills, knowledge and understanding covered in recent lessons and to provide an opportunity for teacher assessment of students’ learning. They may also be used as an opportunity to extend learning, for example through additional reading. The format of these homework tasks will depend on the material being taught and the skills being practised. Examples of the type of task set includes questions to answer, posters and power points to produce, research using books and/or the internet, revision for tests, learning the spelling and meaning of technical language etc. Students are provided with an extra exercise book with their classwork book. This is for key words learnt over the two year course; students fill this in every lesson and are expected to learn key words and their definitions in collaboration with other homework tasks.
     
    What areas would you study?
    • Religious, philosophical and ethical studies in the modern world
      • relationships
      • life and death
      • good and evil
      • human rights
    • Study of Christianity
      • beliefs and teachings
      • practices
    • Study of Islam
      • beliefs and teachings
      • practices

    How are you assessed?

    Assessment consists of three written papers taken at the end of Year 11:

    Paper 1: religious, philosophical & ethical studies in the modern world - 2 hours/50% of qualification

    Paper 2: study of Christianity - 1 hour/25% of qualification

    Paper 3: study of Islam/1 hour - 25% of qualification

    All assessment is undertaken under exam conditions and your answers are assessed against assessment objectives which fall into two categories: 

    • AO1: demonstrate knowledge and understanding of religion and belief
    • A02: analyse and evaluate aspects of religion and belief, including their significance and influence
    Where will this take me post 16?
    Study of religious studies lays a good foundation for further study of religious studies at A-level and complements other related A-level subjects including philosophy, history, politics, sociology, psychology and English literature.
  • Sixth Form

    A-level Philosophy and Ethics

    Examination Board: WJEC Eduqas

    Introduction and Structure

    We follow the WJEC Eduqas Level 3 GCE in religious studies. It is taught as a full two year course and provides students with a critical approach to the consideration of moral and philosophical issues. Students study the theories of philosophers such as Plato, Socrates, Aristotle and Aquinas as well as contemporary discourse from Bertrand Russell and Richard Dawkins. The specification is suitable for candidates of any religious persuasion or none and encourages students to:

    • develop their interest in a rigorous study of religion and belief and relate it to the wider world
    • develop knowledge and understanding appropriate to a specialist study of religion
    • develop an understanding and appreciation of religious thought and its contribution to individuals, communities and societies
    • adopt an enquiring, critical and reflective approach to the study of religion
    • reflect on and develop their own values, opinions and attitudes in light of their study

    Assessment

    Assessment consists of three written papers taken at the end of Year 13:

    Paper 1: study of Christianity – 2 hours/33.5% of qualification

    Paper 2: philosophy of religion – 2 hours/33.5% of qualification

    Paper 3: religion and ethics – 2 hours/33.5% of qualification

    All assessment is undertaken under exam conditions and your answers are assessed against assessment objectives which fall into two categories: 

    • AO1: demonstrate knowledge and understanding of religion and belief (40%)
    • A02: analyse and evaluate aspects of, and approaches to, religion and belief, including their significance, influence and study (60%)

    Reading Material 

    Students are expected to read widely and to be aware of current religious events and issues reported in newspapers and on television. There is an increasingly wide range of information available on the internet, TV and in a variety of other forms from religious and voluntary organisations. The textbooks that you will be required to purchase in preparation are:

    WJEC/Eduqas Religious Studies for A Level Year 1 & AS - Philosophy of Religion and Religion and Ethics
    Richard Gray (Author), Karl Lawson (Author). Illuminate Publishing.

    WJEC/Eduqas Religious Studies for A Level Year 1 & AS – Christianity
    Gwynn Gwilym (Author). Illuminate Publishing.

    Careers

    An A-level in philosophy and ethics allows for a diverse choice of opportunities which include studying law, teaching, police, social work, working in overseas development etc. Many employers like employees to show strong people skills, evaluation skills and the ability to understand different cultures and beliefs; this A-level certainly provides those skills. The fundamental argument skills, logical techniques and evaluative perspective you will develop are an asset to any profession or choice of further study.

    Entrance Requirements

    Minimum requirement: 6 GCSEs Grades 9-4 (or equivalent), including Grade 4 or above in English and maths

    Strongly recommended: Grade 5 in English

    Recommended: Grade 5 in religious studies