In This Section

  • Key Stage 3

    Religious Studies Curriculum and Homework – Year 7

    In addition to the extended learning tasks indicated in the table below, students will be expected to complete regular homework tasks based on the topics being taught in lessons. The purpose of these shorter homework tasks in Religious Studies is to reinforce the skills, knowledge and understanding covered in recent lessons and to provide an opportunity for teacher assessment of students’ learning. They may also be used as an opportunity to extend learning, for example through additional reading or independent research. The format of these homework tasks will depend on the material being taught and the skills being practised. Examples of the type of task set includes questions to answer, posters and power points to produce, research using books and/or the internet, revision for tests, learning the spelling and meaning of technical language etc.

    Curriculum

    Learning Tasks

    Unit

    Topic

    Content

     

     

    Unit 1-  Island Project

     

     

     

     

    Rites of passage

     

    Laws and Guidance

     

    Leaders

     

    Religious books / texts

     

    Celebrations

     

     

    This is an experiential/concept cracking unit based on Sue Phillips’ Island methods of RS. The focus of the term is Christianity so students can study the key tenets and themes of the faith before they study it and compare it to other religions in greater detail in future RS lessons. Students discuss a variety of issues based on the idea that they have landed on an island and have to take on different leadership roles

     

     

    A series / selection of 5 smaller learning tasks throughout the term, where student start to draw links between learning about religion and learning from religion.

     

     

     

    Unit 2 –  Buddhism

     

     

     

    Beginning – Buddha

     

    Dharma

     

    3 Universal Truths

     

    4 Noble truths

     

    Karma / Samsara / Nirvana

     

     

     

    To know the key beliefs within Buddhism, and consider how these beliefs and the actions of Buddhists demonstrate their belief in dharma (teachings of the Buddha). Students will know the life story of Siddattha Gotama (the Buddha), the 3 marks of existence (3 universal truths), 4 noble truths, noble eight-fold path and beliefs about karma, samsara and reincarnation.

     

    Research / design and make a Buddhist garden in a shoe box. Students will be provided with information sheets (available on Fronter) giving several ideas about what items to include and, more importantly, what they symbolise. This is an opportunity for students to demonstrate their research skills and show that they understand the symbolic meaning behind items.

     

     

    Unit 3 – special Places (Pilgrimage)

     

    Pilgrimage- Special journeys

     

    The Holy land

     

    Lourdes

     

    Haaj

     

     

    The unit examines the place of pilgrimage in different religious traditions. Students will discover the history of holy places and their significance to believers.  The unit will enable students to develop an understanding of ‘sacred place’ and how this sense of sacred association has materialised and continues to be expressed today. The unit provides students with an opportunity to relate specific rituals and ceremonies, festivals and celebrations to particular beliefs, people, places, times and activities.

     

     

    Make a scrapbook page that shows the most important place to them and explains why it is important. This could include writing, photos, pictures, mind maps or anything else they would like to include.

     

    Optional Stretch

    Visit a local Church or Cathedral and find out why people who attend think it is a sacred place and why it is important to them. Compare ideas.

     

     

     

    Unit 4- The Environment

     

    Creation

     

    Dominion

     

    Recycling/Sustainable Resources

     

     

    Stewardship

     

     

    Personal responsibility in a wider world.

     

    This unit continues the theme of analysing the impact of belief on action by considering the ethical and philosophical questions surrounding our treatment of the environment. Students may have studied environmental issues elsewhere in the curriculum, but the focus here is upon ways in which beliefs about the natural world affect our social and individual behaviour. Students are also encouraged to reflect upon questions of personal responsibility within the context of a global problem.

     

    Using their knowledge about religious ideas and the environment, students will be asked to create a game, for example board game/ memory/snakes and ladders/ computer game/ quiz. The game must demonstrate subject knowledge and an understanding of one religion’s particular attitude towards the environment.

     

    Religious Studies Curriculum and Homework – Year 8

    In addition to the extended pupil learning tasks indicated in the table below, pupils will be expected to complete regular homework tasks based on the topics being taught in lessons. The purpose of these shorter weekly homework tasks in Religious Studies is to reinforce the skills, knowledge and understanding covered in recent lessons and to provide an opportunity for teacher assessment of pupils’ learning. They may also be used as an opportunity to extend learning, for example through additional reading. The format of these homework tasks will depend on the material being taught and the skills being practised. Examples of the type of task set includes questions to answer, posters and power points to produce, research using books and/or the internet, revision for tests, learning the spelling and meaning of technical language etc. 

    Curriculum

    Learning Tasks

    Unit

    Topic

    Content

     

    Unit 1- Putting Belief into practice

     

     

    Worship

     

    Christian/ Muslim worship

     

    Ethical issues

     

     

    The theme of this unit is how people put their beliefs and faith into practice. There are two strands to this:  worship, including hero worship, and religious worship, as well as ethical and life issues and how religious beliefs will affect people ideas and actions with certain issues. Both secular and religious responses are featured, with no value judgement about which is most appropriate.

     

    The learning task for this unit is for students to create a visual representation of the idea of worship. They will be asked to present subject knowledge by including different aspects of worship (Learning about RS) and personal reflection thinking about the practicalities of worship within different religions in the 21st century.  (Learning from RS).

     

     

     

    Unit 2 –   The Search for Truth

     

     

    Truth

     

    Different types of truth

     

    Evidence

     

    The difference between science and religion

     

    Miracles

     

     

     

    To know the key beliefs about truth, and to consider how these beliefs affect the actions of believers. Students will know how different people in society search for truth and the origins of our understandings. Students will investigate events from four different perspectives and will analyse the difference and validity of these perspectives.

     

    The learning task for this unit is for the students to create a poster for a class of 11-year-olds who are confused about how to find truth. The guidebook must contain:

    • A description of the four different types of truth.
    • An example to go with each of the four truths.
    • A picture for each truth to visually explain the type of truth.

     

     

    Unit 3 – Religion and the Media

     

     

    Media

     

    Christian response

     

    Case Studies

     

    God Slot

     

    Mass Communication

     

    This topic explores media in its various forms. Students will discuss:

    • how is religion portrayed in the media

    • the positive and negative sides of religious portrayal

    • should religions be able to censor what is shown through different media forms?

    • how and why religions use the media

    • what impact does religious media have on those looking on – believers and non-believers?

    • what does religious media tell us – about God, about belief, about the producers

     

     

    Students need to create a script, story or movie that depicts religious characters in a non-stereotypical way. Student have the option to either write this in script form or to create a visual (film) representation. Students need to include a religious character and a storyline.

    Students need to make sure they are accurate and non-stereotypical with their characters. The scene can be in the style of a soap, the news, documentary or film.

     

    Unit 4 - Afterlife

     

    Heaven

     

    Hell

     

    Purgatory

     

    Original Sin

     

    The Fall

     

     

    This unit will give an overview of the Christian understanding of life after death. Students will look into stereotypical understandings of heaven and hell. They will move onto to investigating different denominations views on purgatory before learning about Original Sin and the Fall. Students will analyse the stories and will consolidate the importance of the stories for Christians.

     

     

     

    Students need to complete a leaflet on how to get into heaven. Students need to include:

     

    • How to get there (behaviour that will get you in!)
    • A list of top behaviours to help you get into heaven and a top 5 for not getting in (DOs and DON’Ts
    • What it is like
    • Why it’ll be worth going there

     

    Optional Stretch:

    • Christian beliefs about heaven and explain the influence the belief in heaven has on Christians, past and present and what atheists may say about its influence on believers.
    • What Christians believe heaven is like, now and in the past, and what the ‘Beatific Vision’ is.

    Religious Studies Curriculum and Homework – Year 9

    In addition to the extended learning tasks indicated in the table below, students will be expected to complete regular homework tasks based on the topics being taught in lessons. The purpose of these shorter weekly homework tasks in Religious Studies is to reinforce the skills, knowledge and understanding covered in recent lessons and to provide an opportunity for teacher assessment of students’ learning. They may also be used as an opportunity to extend learning, for example through additional reading. The format of these homework tasks will depend on the material being taught and the skills being practised. Examples of the type of task set includes questions to answer, posters and power points to produce, research using books and/or the internet, revision for tests, learning the spelling and meaning of technical language etc.

     

    Curriculum

    Learning Tasks

    Unit

    Topic

    Content

     

    Unit 1- Science vs. Religion- How did we get here?

     

     

     

    Creation

     

    Desisgn

     

    First cause theory

     

    Evolution

     

     

    This unit looks at the great mysteries of why life exists and if, when and how the world might end. It covers both religious and non-religious points of view, and students will be encouraged to explore the validity of these ideas and compare them.

     

     

    Preparing a personal response, either defending or challenging the following statement.

    ‘Having a scientific view of the origins of the universe does not necessarily rule out belief in God.’

     

    Presented in an essay form.

     

    Unit 2-Religion and Conflict

     

    Just War

     

    Pacifism

     

    Punishment

     

    Capital Punishment

     

    Injustice

     

    In this unit students consider some of the big questions about punishment. When looking into conflict students have to consider the Christian response to violence. Students will investigate pacifism as well as capital punishment. Students will then reflect on their own understanding of acceptable punishment and justice.

     

     

    Students will be asked to produce a newspaper article explaining the key ethical issues raised by conflict. Students are recommended to complete their own research and discuss the positives/negatives of capital punishment. Students must include a Christian response in their article.

     

     

     

     

    Unit 3- Religion and Medicine

     

     

    Sanctity of Life

     

    Abortion

     

    Cloning

     

    Euthanasia

     

    Fertility Treatment

    Students explore the Christian responses towards medical ethics. Students will first consider what the term ethics means before exploring different areas of medicine which raise debate within different Christian denominations.  Throughout the lessons pupils should be challenged to explain and justify their reasoning, considering how they have reached their opinions, why they hold these opinions and how they are learning not only about but from religion. By demonstrating an appreciation of both religious views and the views of others pupils will be guided though the notion that there are often no right or wrong answers in life and to understand the many shades of ‘grey’.

     

     

     

    Students need to produce a report for the Government on a contemporary moral issue which includes the Roman Catholic and Church of England response to one ethical topic of their choice such as Abortion or Fertility treatment.

     

     

     

     

    Unit 4 – Religion and Equality

     

    Ethics

     

    Stereotyping

     

    Prejudice

     

    Discrimination

     

    Racism

     

    Equality

     

     

    In this unit students will explore the concept of equality. The scheme will encourage students to separate and differentiate between different types of discrimination. Students will be given opportunities to question and recognise contemporary issues that still exist in British society. Students will look into the Christian response towards equality and discrimination.

     

     

     

    Students need to choose and research a significant person who has fought for equality such as MLK. Students need to create a bio of the chosen individual (including images) which will show their history and notable achievements in regards to equality.

     

     

  • Key Stage 4

    Religious Studies Curriculum and Homework – Year 10 and 11 Philosophy and Ethics

    First Teaching September 2016

    We follow the WJEC/Eduqas GCSE Religious Studies A which offers students the opportunity for the thematic study of Religion and religious responses to fundamental ethical questions of life. This specification is suitable for candidates of any religious persuasion or none. This specification encourages students to:

    • Develop their knowledge and understanding of religions and non-religious beliefs, such as atheism and humanism
    • Develops their knowledge and understanding of religious beliefs, teachings, practices, and sources of wisdom and authority
    • Develops their ability to construct well-argued, well-informed and balanced arguments, demonstrating their depth and breadth of understanding in the subject
    • Reflect on and develop their own values, beliefs, and attitudes in light of what they have learnt and contributes to their preparation for adult life in a pluralistic society and global community

    There are 3 written papers at the end of year 11 – 1 x 2 hours and 2 x 1 hour. Candidates will answer compulsory questions focusing on knowledge, understanding and evaluation of the subject content.

    Paper 1 – Component 1 – Religious, Philosophical and Ethical Studies in the Modern World. 2 Hours 50%

    Paper 2 – Component 2 – Study of Christianity. 1 Hour 25%

    Paper 3 – Component 3 – Study of Islam. 1 Hour 25%

    GCSE grading is reported on a nine point scale from 1-9, where 9 is the highest grade.

    All assessment is undertaken under exam conditions and answers are assessed again ‘assessment objectives’, which fall into two categories

    • A01-Demostrate knowledge and understanding of religion and belief including:
      • Beliefs, practices and sources of authority
      • Influence on individuals, communities and societies
      • Similarities and differences within and/or between religions and beliefs
    • A02-Analyse and evaluate aspects of religion and belief, including their significance and influence.

    The table below shows the weighting of AO1 and AO2 for each component and for the GCSE as a whole.

     

    AO1

    AO2

    Component 1

    25%

    25%

    Component 2

    12.5%

    12.5%

    Component 3

    12.5%

    12.5%

    Overall Weighting

    50%

    50%

    Study of Religious Studies lays a good foundation for further study of Religious Studies at A-level and complements other related A-level subjects including Philosophy, Law, History, History of Art, Government and Politics, Sociology, Psychology and English Literature.

    In addition to the extended learning tasks indicated in the table below, students will be expected to complete regular homework tasks based on the topics being taught in lessons. The purpose of these shorter weekly homework tasks in Religious Studies is to reinforce the skills, knowledge and understanding covered in recent lessons and to provide an opportunity for teacher assessment of students’ learning. They may also be used as an opportunity to extend learning, for example through additional reading. The format of these homework tasks will depend on the material being taught and the skills being practised. Examples of the type of task set includes questions to answer, posters and power points to produce, research using books and/or the internet, revision for tests, learning the spelling and meaning of technical language etc.

    Student are provided with an extra exercise book with their classwork book. This is for key words learnt over the two-year programme, students fill this in every lesson and are expected to learn key words and their definitions in collaboration with other homework tasks.

    Curriculum

    Learning Tasks

    Component

    Topic

    Content

     

    Component 1-Religious, Philisophical and Ethical Studies in the Modern World

     

    Issues of Relationships

     

    In this unit students are required to consider characteristics of relationships, marriage and family life. Students will study beliefs and teachings, questions relating to issues of relationships in the 21st century, same sex relationships and gender roles.

    Students will cover the following content:

    • Beliefs, attitudes and teachings about the nature and purpose of relationships in the 21st century: families, roles of women and men, marriage outside the religious tradition and cohabitation.
    • The nature and purpose of marriage as expressed through Christian marriage ceremonies in Britain.
    • Varying Christian attitudes towards adultery, divorce and annulment, separation and re-marriage.
    • Christian teachings about the nature and purpose of sex and the use of contraception including varied interpretations of Natural Law/Absolutist approach of Thomas Aquinas Five Primary Precepts.
    • Diverse attitudes within and across Christian traditions towards same sex relationships.
    • Diverse attitudes within Christianity towards the roles of women and men in worship and authority with reference to Catholic, Orthodox and Anglican views.

     

    Extended HW project

     

    Exam Style Q – throughout the unit.

     

    Revision leading to  End of Unit Test

     

     

    Component 1-Religious, Philisophical and Ethical Studies in the Modern World

     

     

    Issues of Life and Death

     

     

     

    In this unit students are required to consider religious and non-religious beliefs about the nature of life and death and the origins and value of the universe and human life.

    Students will follow the following content:

    • Diverse Christian beliefs, teachings and attitudes about the accounts of the origin of the universe: Genesis 1 and 2.
    • The relationship between Christian views and non-religious views of creation and the extent to which they conflict: Stephen Hawking’s view of the Big Bang.
    • Christian and non-religious beliefs, teachings and attitudes about dominion, stewardship and environmental responsibility.
    • Diverse Christian beliefs, teachings and attitudes towards the origin and sanctity of human life.
    • Diverse Christian attitudes towards abortion and Euthanasia.
    • Non-religious views on the importance of human and animal life
    • Humanist ‘Dignity in Dying’ movement.
    • Beliefs and teachings on life after death including the soul, judgement, heaven and hell.
    • Diverse Christian teachings about the afterlife.
    • How Christian and Humanist funerals in Britain reflect beliefs about the afterlife.

     

     

     

    Extended HW project

     

    Exam Style Q – throughout the unit.

     

    Revision leading to  End of Unit Test

     

     

    Component 1-Religious, Philisophical and Ethical Studies in the Modern World

     

    Issues of Good and Evil

     

    In this unit students consider philosophical questions concerning the origins and nature of good and evil. Through a study of teachings and beliefs, questions relating to the causes of crime and attitudes towards the aims of punishment and treatment of criminals.

    Students will cover the following content:

    • What makes an act ‘wrong’?
    • Religious and ethical responses to relative and absolute morality, conscience, virtues and sin.
    • Beliefs and attitudes about the causes of crime and the aims of punishment: justice, retribution, deterrence and reformation.
    • The treatment of criminals and the work of prison reformers and prison chaplains.
    • Varied Conservative and Liberal Christian responses to the Death Penalty.
    • Christian teachings on forgiveness.
    • Philosophical perspectives on the origin of evil: Original Sin, free will and the soul.
    • Philosophical challenges posed by belief in God, free will and the existence of evil and suffering.

     

    Extended HW project

     

    Exam Style Q – throughout the unit.

     

    Revision leading to  End of Unit Test

     

    Component 1-Religious, Philisophical and Ethical Studies in the Modern World

     

    Issues of Human Rights

     

    In this unit students will consider contemporary issues of human rights and social justice and their relationship with religion and belief. Students will be expected to consider specific issues of wealth and poverty, racial prejudice and discrimination.

    Students will cover the following content:

    • Christian beliefs, teachings and attitudes toward the dignity of human life.
    • Christian practices to promote human rights including equality: agape in action.
    • An example of conflict between personal conviction and the laws of a country.
    • Censorship, freedom of religious expression and religious extremism.
    • Christian beliefs, teachings and attitudes towards prejudice and discrimination.
    • Christian beliefs, teachings and attitudes towards racial prejudice and discrimination, including Martin Luther King’s teachings on equality.
    • Ethical considerations about acquisition and use of wealth.
    • The actions and attitudes of Christian charities in 21st century Britain whose aim is to alleviate poverty: Christian Aid.

     

    Extended HW project

     

    Exam Style Q – throughout the unit.

     

    Revision leading to  End of Unit Test

     

     

    Component 2-Study of Christianity

    Beliefs and Teachings

     

    Students must know, understand and express common and divergent views and the basis for beliefs, teachings and practices. References to relevant sources of wisdom and authority are expected, including scripture and/or sacred texts.

    Student will cover the following content:

    • The Nature of God:
      •  Omnipotent, Omnibenevolent. The trinity, beliefs and teachings about the oneness of God.
    • Creation:
      • Genesis, the nature and role of humans, literal and non-literal ways of interpretation.
      • The role of Word and Spirit in creation.
    • Jesus Christ:
      • Beliefs and teachings about Jesus’ incarnation.
      • Crucifixion, Salvation and Atonement.
      • Resurrection.
      • Ascension.
    • Salvation:
      • Law: The Word of God, inspiration and revelation, differing ways of interpreting biblical writings, Bible in relation to other sources of authority.
      • Sin as preventing salvation.
      • Grace and the Spirit.
      • Evangelical worship.
    • The Afterlife
      • Eschatological beliefs.
      • Judgement.
      • Resurrection.
      • Traditional and contemporary beliefs about heaven and hell.

    Extended HW project

     

    Exam Style Q – throughout the unit.

     

    Revision leading to  End of Unit Test

    Component 2-Study of Christianity

    Practices

     

    Students must know, understand and express common and divergent views and the basis for beliefs, teachings and practices. References to relevant sources of wisdom and authority are expected, including scripture and/or sacred texts.

    Student will cover the following content:

    • Forms of Worship:
      • The nature and significance of liturgical, informal and individual worship.
      • The nature and importance of prayer: The Lord’s Prayer.
      • Set prayers and informal prayers: different forms of worship across the different Christian traditions with reference to Society of Friends and Evangelical worship.
    • Sacraments:
      • Diverse beliefs regarding Sacraments.
      • The role, meaning and celebration of Baptism and Eucharist.
      • Diverse interpretations of Baptism and Eucharist with reference to the beliefs of the Catholic and Protestant Churches.
    • Pilgrimage and Celebrations:
      • The importance of pilgrimage.
      • How Christians celebrate Christmas and Easter.
    • Christianity in Britain and the Church in the local community:
      • Christianity in Britain, 2011 census compared to 2001.
      • UK laws, festivals and traditions.
      • The role of the church in the local community, a place of worship, social and community functions.

    Extended HW project

     

    Exam Style Q – throughout the unit.

     

    Revision leading to  End of Unit Test

     

     

    Component 3-Study of Islam

    Beliefs and Teachings

     

    Students must know, understand and express common and divergent views and the basis for beliefs, teachings and practices. References to relevant sources of wisdom and authority are expected, including scripture and/or sacred texts.

    Student will cover the following content:

    • The Nature of Allah:
      • The teaching about the nature of Allah, oneness
      • Immanence, transcendence, omnipotence, beneficence, mercy, fairness and justice.
      • Adalat in Shi’a Islam
    • Prophet hood (Risalah)
      • The nature of the prophet hood, why are prophets important?
      • The importance of Adam as the first prophet.
      • Ibrahim as the father of Isaac and Ishma’il and his significance for the Muslim religion.
      • Isa as a prophet for Muslims.
      • Muhammad as the seal of the prophets.
    • Angels
      • The significance of angels in Islam.
      • Diversity in belief between Shi’a and Sunni Muslims regarding angels and free will.
      • The significance of Jibril’s revelation of the Qur’an to Muhammed.
      • The significance of Mika’il placed in charge of plants and rain.
      • The significance of Israfil to announce the Day of Resurrection.
    • Akhirah (Afterlife)
      • Al-Qadr (predestination): implications for human freedom.
      • Akhirah: human responsibility and accountability, Muslim beliefs and teachings about the afterlife.
      • Human Freedom and its relationship to Day of Judgement.
      • Heaven: Muslim beliefs about the nature, stages and purpose of heaven.
      • Hell: Muslim beliefs about the nature and purpose of hell.
    • Foundations of Faith:
      • The six articles of faith in Sunni Islam.
      • The five roots in Usul ad-Din in Shi’a Islam.
      • Islamic attitudes towards Kutub (books), Sahifah (scrolls), Injil (gospel), Tawrat (torah) and Zabur (psalms).

    Extended HW project

     

    Exam Style Q – throughout the unit.

     

    Revision leading to  End of Unit Test

     

    Component 3-Study of Islam

    Practices

     

    Students must know, understand and express common and divergent views and the basis for beliefs, teachings and practices. References to relevant sources of wisdom and authority are expected, including scripture and/or sacred texts.

    Student will cover the following content:

    • The Five Pillars of Sunni Islam: practices in Britain and elsewhere:
      • Shahadah: the Muslim statement of faith.
      • Zakah: How Sunni Muslims make payment of charity tax, alms and how zakat money may be spent.
      • Sawm: How Sunni Muslims fast during Ramadan, issues eith fasting in Britain.
      • Makkah: Issues relating to Muslims in Britain undertaking Hajj.
      • Salah: The practives of prayer in Islam in the mosque and at home, including Jummah prayer.
    • Ten Obligatory Acts of Shi’a Islam: practices in Britain and elsewhere:
      • Salat: How Shi’a Muslims perform salat, observe sawm, pay zakat and pilgrimage to Makkah.
      • Khums: How Shi’a
      • Hajj: pilgrimage to Makkah and pilgrimage to Shi’a shrines.
      • Jihad: The struggle to live as a Muslim.
      • Amr-bil-Maroof: How Muslims encourage others to do good.
      • Nahil Anril Munkar: How Muslims discourage bad actions.
      • Tawalia: The duty to love the friends of Allah.
      • Tabarra: The duty to express disapproval of evil-doers.
    • Jihad:
      • Greater Jihad: The daily struggle to live as a good Muslim, issues regarding living as a Muslim in Britain today and maintaining a Muslim lifestyle.
      • Origins, influence and conditions for declaration of Lesser Jihad in the Qur’an and Hadith.
    • Festivals and commemorations: practices in Britain and elsewhere:
      • Id-ul-Adha: The festival of sacrifice, how Muslims celebrate Id-ul-Adha in Britain and worldwide.
      • Id-ul-Fitr: The festival of fast-breaking following Ramadan. How Muslims celebrate Id-ul-Fitr in Britain and worldwide.
      • Ashura: The Day of Remembrance (Shi’a). How Shi’a Muslims celebrate Ashura in Britain and worldwide.
      • The Night of Power: the importance of the revelation of the Qur’an and how it is viewed and treated in Islam

    Extended HW project

     

    Exam Style Q – throughout the unit.

     

    Revision leading to  End of Unit Test

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Sixth Form

    Religious Studies Curriculum and Homework – Year 12-13 Philosophy and Ethics

    We follow the WJEC/Eduqas Level 3 Advanced Subsidiary GCE in Religious Studies. It is taught as a full 2-year course. It consists of 3 written papers, all of which will be taken at the end of year 13.

    Paper 1 – Component 1 – A Study of Christianity. 2 hours 33.5%

    Paper 2 – Component 2 – Philosophy of Religion. 2 hours 33.5%

    Paper 3 – Component 3 – Religion and Ethics. 2 hours 33.5%

    This specification is suitable for candidates of any religious persuasion or none. The specification encourages students to:

    • Develop their interest in a rigorous study of religion and belief and relate it to the wider world.
    • Develop knowledge and understanding appropriate to a specialist study of religion.
    • Develop an understanding and appreciation of religious thought and its contribution to individuals, communities and societies.
    • Adopt an enquiring, critical and reflective approach to the study of religion.
    • Reflect on and develop their own values, opinions and attitudes in light of their study.

    How will I be assessed? 

    All assessment is undertaken under exam conditions and your answers are assessed against, ‘assessment objectives’, which fall into two categories: 

    • AO1-Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of religion and belief including:
      • Religious, philosophical and/or ethical thought and teaching.
      • Influence of beliefs, teachings and practices on individuals, communities and societies.
      • Cause and significance of similarities and differences in belief, teaching and practice.
      • Approaches to the study of religion and belief.
    • A02-Analyse and evaluate aspects of, and approaches to, religion and belief, including their significance, influence and study.

    The table below shows the weighting of AO1 and AO2 for each component and for the A Level as a whole.

     

    AO1

    AO2

    Component 1

    13.33%

    20%

    Component 2

    13.33%

    20%

    Component 3

    13.33%

    20%

    Overall Weighting

    40%

    60%

    Reading Material   

    Students are expected to read widely. It is recommended that students be aware of current religious events and issues reported in newspapers and on television. There is an increasingly wide range of information available on video/DVD, the internet, TV, and in a variety of other forms from religious and voluntary organisations. 

    There is a complete reading list available on (www.WJEC.com). 

    The textbook that you will be required to purchase in preparation is:

    WJEC/Eduqas Religious Studies for A Level Year 1 & AS - Philosophy of Religion and Religion and Ethics

    Richard Gray (Author), Karl Lawson (Author)

    Illuminate Publishing

    WJEC/Eduqas Religious Studies for A Level Year 1 & AS – Christianity

    Gwynn Gwilym (Author)

    Illuminate Publishing

    Curriculum

    Learning Tasks

    Component

    Topic

    Content

     

    1-A Study of Chrisianity

     

    Theme 1-Religious Figures and Sacred Texts

     

    This component provides students with the opportunity to undertake and in depth and broad study of Christianity covering themes ranging from religious figures and sacred texts to practices that shape religious identity.

    Students will cover the following topics in depth:

    • Jesus-his birth
    • Jesus-his resurrection
    • The Bible as a source of wisdom and authority in daily life
    • The Bible as a source of authority
    • The early church (in Acts of the Apostles)
    • Two views of Jesus

     

    Extended HW project

     

    Exam Style Q – throughout the unit.

     

    Revision leading to  End of Unit Test

     

     

    1-A Study of Christianity

     

     

    Theme 2-Religious Concepts and Religious Life

     

     

     

    This component provides students with the opportunity to undertake and in depth and broad study of Christianity covering themes ranging from religious figures and sacred texts to practices that shape religious identity.

    Students will cover the following topics in depth:

    • Religious concepts-the nature of God
    • Is God male?
    • Can God suffer?
    • Religious concepts-the trinity
    • Religious concepts-the Atonement
    • Religious life-faith and works
    • Religious life-the community of believers
    • Religious life-key moral principles

     

     

     

    Extended HW project

     

    Exam Style Q – throughout the unit.

     

    Revision leading to  End of Unit Test

     

     

    1-A Study of Christianity

     

    Theme 3-Significatn Social and Historical Developments in Religious Thought

     

    This component provides students with the opportunity to undertake and in depth and broad study of Christianity covering themes ranging from religious figures and sacred texts to practices that shape religious identity.

    Students will cover the following topics in depth:

    • Social developments in religious thought-attitudes towards wealth
    • Social development in religious thought-migration and Christianity in the UK
    • The relationship between religion and society: religion, equality and discrimination
    • Social developments in religious thought-feminist theology and the changing role of men and women
    • The relationship between religion and society: respect and recognition and the ways that religious traditions view other religions and non-religious worldviews and their truth claims
    • Historical developments in religious thought-challenges from secularisation
    • Historical developments in religious thought-challenges from science
    • Historical developments in religious thought-challenges from pluralism and diversity within a tradition

     

    Extended HW project

     

    Exam Style Q – throughout the unit.

     

    Revision leading to  End of Unit Test

     

    1-A Study of Christianity

     

    Theme 4-Religious Practices that Shape Religious Identity

     

    This component provides students with the opportunity to undertake and in depth and broad study of Christianity covering themes ranging from religious figures and sacred texts to practices that shape religious identity.

    Students will cover the following topics in depth:

    • Religious identity through baptism
    • Religious identity through diversity in Eucharist
    • Religious identity through diversity in festivals: Christmas and Easter
    • Religious identity though unification
    • Religious identity through religious experience
    • Religious identity through responses to poverty and injustice
    • How developments in beliefs and practices have, over time, influenced and been influenced by developments in philosophical, ethical studies of religion

     

    Extended HW project

     

    Exam Style Q – throughout the unit.

     

    Revision leading to  End of Unit Test

     

     

    Component 2-Philosophy of Religion

     

    Theme 1-Arguments for the Existence of God - Inductive

     

    This component provides students with the opportunity to undertake an in depth and broad study of fundamental philosophical themes, ranging from arguments for the existence of God to the use of religious language.

    Students will cover the following topics in depth:

    • Inductive arguments-cosmological
    • Inductive arguments-teleological
    • Challenges to inductive arguments
    • Deductive arguments-origins of the ontological argument
    • Deductive arguments-developments of the ontological argument
    • Challenges to the ontological argument

    Extended HW project

     

    Exam Style Q – throughout the unit.

     

    Revision leading to  End of Unit Test

    Component 2-Philosophy of Religion

     

    Theme 2-Challenges to Religious Belief – The Problem of Evil and Suffering

     

    This component provides students with the opportunity to undertake an in depth and broad study of fundamental philosophical themes, ranging from arguments for the existence of God to the use of religious language.

    Students will cover the following topics in depth:

    • The problem of evil and suffering
    • Religious responses to the problem of evil
      • Augustinian type of theodicy
      • Irenaean type theodicy
    • Religious belief as a product of the human mind: Sigmund Freud
    • Religious belief as a product of the human mind: Carl Jung
    • Issues relating to rejection of religion-atheism

    Extended HW project

     

    Exam Style Q – throughout the unit.

     

    Revision leading to  End of Unit Test

     

     

    Component 2-Philosphy of Religion

     

    Theme 3-Religious Experience

     

    This component provides students with the opportunity to undertake an in depth and broad study of fundamental philosophical themes, ranging from arguments for the existence of God to the use of religious language.

    Students will cover the following topics in depth:

    • The nature of religious experience: Visions, Conversion, Mysticism and Prayer
    • Mystical experience
    • Challenges to the objectivity and authenticity of religious experience
    • The influence of religious experience on religious practice and faith
    • Miracles (definitions of)
    • A comparative study of two key scholars from within and outside the Christian tradition and their contrasting views on the possibility of miracles

    Extended HW project

     

    Exam Style Q – throughout the unit.

     

    Revision leading to  End of Unit Test

     

     

    Component 2-Philosophy of Religion

     

    Theme 4-Religious Language

     

    This component provides students with the opportunity to undertake an in depth and broad study of fundamental philosophical themes, ranging from arguments for the existence of God to the use of religious language.

    Students will cover the following topics in depth:

    • Inherent problems of religious language
    • Religious language as cognitive but meaningless
    • Religious language as non-cognitive and analogical
    • Religious language as non-cognitive and symbolic
    • Religious language as non-cognitive and mythical
    • Religious language as a language game

    Extended HW project

     

    Exam Style Q – throughout the unit.

     

    Revision leading to  End of Unit Test

     

     

    Component 3-Religion and Ethics

     

    Theme 1-Ethical Thought

     

    This component provides students with the opportunity to undertake an in depth and broad study of fundamental ethical themes, ranging from ethical language and thought to freewill and determinism.

    Students will cover the following topics in depth:

    • Divine Command Theory
    • Virtue Theory
    • Ethical Egoism
    • Meta-ethical approaches-Naturalism
    • Meta-ethical approaches-Intuitionism
    • Meta-ethical approaches-Emotivism

     

     

    Component 3-Religion and Ethics

     

     

    Theme 2-Deontological Ethics

     

    This component provides students with the opportunity to undertake an in depth and broad study of fundamental ethical themes, ranging from ethical language and thought to freewill and determinism.

    Students will cover the following topics in depth:

    • St Thomas Aquinas’ Natural Law-laws and precepts as the basis of morality
    • Aquinas’ Natural Law-the role of virtues and goods in supporting behaviour
    • Aquinas’ Natural Law-application of the theory
    • John Finnis’ development of Natural Law
    • Bernard Hoose’s Proportionalism
    • Finnis’ Natural Law and Hoose’s Proportionalism: application of the theory

     

     

    Component 3: Religion and Ethics

     

     

    Theme 3-Teleological Ethics

     

    This component provides students with the opportunity to undertake an in depth and broad study of fundamental ethical themes, ranging from ethical language and thought to freewill and determinism.

    Students will cover the following topics in depth:

    • Joseph Fletcher’s Situation Ethics-his rejection of other forms of ethics and his acceptance of agape as the basis of morality
    • Fletcher’s Situation Ethics-the principles as a means of assessing morality
    • Fletcher’s Situation Ethics-application of theory
    • Classical Utilitarianism-Jeremy Bentham’s Act Utilitarianism: happiness as the basis of morality
    • John Stuart Mill’s development of Utilitarianism: types of pleasure, the harm principle and the use of rules
    • Betham’s Act Utilitarianism and Mill’s Rule Utilitarianism-application theory

     

     

    Component 3: Religion and Ethics

     

    Theme 4-Determinism and Free Will

     

    This component provides students with the opportunity to undertake an in depth and broad study of fundamental ethical themes, ranging from ethical language and thought to freewill and determinism.

    Students will cover the following topics in depth:

    • Religious concepts of predestination, with reference to the teachings of St Augustine and John Calvin
    • Concepts of determinism
    • The implications of predestination/determinism
    • Religious concepts of free will with reference to teachings of Pelagius and Arminius
    • Concepts of libertarianism
    • The implications of libertarianism and free will.

     

     

  • Assessment

    How will I be assessed in Religious Studies at THS?

    At KS3 (years 7-9) students are assessed by the Religious Studies Skills ladder. Students work up the ladders gaining skills valuable for GCSE and A Level study. Students are assessed through classwork, homework and assessments.

    KS3 Pupil Friendly Skills Ladder for Religious Studies

    Knowledge and Understanding

    Expressing and Communicating Ideas

    Analyse-examine arguments in detail, justifying perspectives

    Assess-judge the importance or value of. Come to a conclusion about it

    Evaluate-diverse beliefs, sources, and perspectives

    Interpret-explain the meaning of something in a simpler way

    Understood-ideas and practices, linking view points

    Justify=prove your idea or opinion is fair/right/valid

    Contrast-compare one thing to another and point out any difference

    Explain-diverse ideas and demonstrate empathy and understanding

    Compare-look at different religious ideas in order to find connections

    Demonstrate-show or prove by reasoning or evidence/using examples

    Explain-ideas and practices, linking viewpoints

    Discuss-talk about a subject. Listen to others before making your point

    Describe-meanings for different religious sources and practices

    Questioning-Ask questions, give opinion and respond to ideas in RS

    At GCSE students have 3 written papers at the end of year 11 – 1 x 2 hours and 2 x 1 hour. Candidates will answer compulsory questions focusing on knowledge, understanding and evaluation of the subject content.

    Paper 1 – Component 1 – Religious, Philosophical and Ethical Studies in the Modern World. 2 Hours 50%

    Paper 2 – Component 2 – Study of Christianity. 1 Hour 25%

    Paper 3 – Component 3 – Study of Islam. 1 Hour 25%

    GCSE grading is reported on a nine-point scale from 1-9, where 9 is the highest grade.

    All assessment is undertaken under exam conditions and answers are assessed again ‘assessment objectives’, which fall into two categories

    • A01-Demostrate knowledge and understanding of religion and belief including:
      • Beliefs, practices and sources of authority
      • Influence on individuals, communities and societies
      • Similarities and differences within and/or between religions and beliefs
    • A02-Analyse and evaluate aspects of religion and belief, including their significance and influence.

    The table below shows the weighting of AO1 and AO2 for each component and for the GCSE as a whole.

     

    AO1

    AO2

    Component 1

    25%

    25%

    Component 2

    12.5%

    12.5%

    Component 3

    12.5%

    12.5%

    Overall Weighting

    50%

    50%

    At A Level student undertake 3 written papers, all of which will be taken at the end of year 13.

    Paper 1 – Component 1 – A Study of Christianity. 2 hours 33.5%

    Paper 2 – Component 2 – Philosophy of Religion. 2 hours 33.5%

    Paper 3 – Component 3 – Religion and Ethics. 2 hours 33.5%

    All assessment is undertaken under exam conditions and your answers are assessed against, ‘assessment objectives’, which fall into two categories: 

    • AO1-Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of religion and belief including:
      • Religious, philosophical and/or ethical thought and teaching.
      • Influence of beliefs, teachings and practices on individuals, communities and societies.
      • Cause and significance of similarities and differences in belief, teaching and practice.
      • Approaches to the study of religion and belief.
    • A02-Analyse and evaluate aspects of, and approaches to, religion and belief, including their significance, influence and study.

    The table below shows the weighting of AO1 and AO2 for each component and for the A Level as a whole.

     

    AO1

    AO2

    Component 1

    13.33%

    20%

    Component 2

    13.33%

    20%

    Component 3

    13.33%

    20%

    Overall Weighting

    40%

    60%

     
  • Enrichment