In This Section

  • Key Stage 3

    The Key Stage 3 Science course is condensed into years 7 and 8.  This enables pupils to start work relevant to GCSE courses in Year 9.  As well as the topic content pupils study skills needed for working scientifically, i.e. planning investigations, carrying them out and analysing the results.  The pupil learning tasks (PLTs) support this development and are set approximately every half term. 

    Year 7

    Unit

    Topic

    Pupil Learning task

    B1

    B2

    C1

    C2

    P1

    P2

    Cells & Reproduction

    Inheritance & Interdependence

    Particles & Changes

    Acids & Rocks

    Energy & Electricity 1

    Forces and Planets

    Big Mums, Big Babies? –Data analysis

    Hunters Success – Interpreting Data

    Water Worries –The application of science

    Indigestion remedy - investigation planning

    Nuclear Safety –Interpreting Data

    Skateboarding – Investigation planning

    Year 8

    Unit

    Topic

    Pupil Learning task

    B3

    B4

    C3

    C4

    P3

    P4

    P5

    P6

    Nutrition & Photosynthesis

    Respiration & Movement

    Elements and Compounds

    Chemical Reactions

    Machines

    Energy & Electricity 2

    Forces & Motion

    Waves

    Breaking Up Food – investigation plan

    How Do We Breathe? - Application of Science

    -

    Making MgO – data analysis

    Investigating Moments – planning

    Electromagnet Strength – data analysis

    -

    Hearing Hopes – application of Science

    In addition to the extended pupil learning tasks (PLT) indicated in the table below, pupils will be expected to complete regular homework tasks based on the topics being taught in lessons. The purpose of these shorter weekly homework tasks in science is to reinforce the skills, knowledge and understanding covered in recent lessons and to provide an opportunity for teacher assessment of pupils’ learning. They may also be used as an opportunity to extend learning, for example through additional reading. The format of these homework tasks will depend on the material being taught and the skills being practised. Examples of the type of task set includes questions to answer, posters and power points to produce, research using books and/or the internet, revision for tests, learning the spelling and meaning of technical language etc. Worksheets will, wherever possible, be made available on Fronter, in the Science pupil resources room as are full details for the tasks listed below.

    To reduce the demand for certain types of equipment in lower school, topics are taught to different groups in a different order. On average, they will complete just over one topic per half term.  At the start of the academic year pupils will be given the order of topics for their science group. The teacher will also inform them at the beginning of each term which PLT task they will be asked to do.  The task will be relevant to that half term’s work.

    Year 9

    In the first term pupils study a unit of work designed to prepare them for the Working Scientifically aspects of GCSE.  This includes ideas on planning, carrying out and analysing data from investigative work.  Pupils are introduced to the mathematical requirements of the course and carry out work related to these areas.

    After Christmas Year 9 will start working on components of the GCSE course which are relevant to both Combined and Separate Science GCSE courses.

  • Key Stage 4
    Double Science
    All students will study core science in Year 10 and Year 11. Triple science is also available as an option subject (see page 17).
     
    Why study science?
    Our world is constantly changing and evolving. There has been a revolution in the way information is stored and accessed, via the web. Due to the demands we make on the planet’s resources and the environment, we need to develop new or alternative solutions for nearly everything we do, from fuel production to waste disposal. By studying science, you could have a fascinating and crucial role to play by, for example, designing realistic alternative energy sources, helping people to live more sustainably or discovering new medicines and vaccines for treating diseases.
     
    What areas would you study?
    Study the life processes and habits of all living things, from tiny single cells to whole organisms and how they interact with each other and with their environment. Investigate materials in terms of their structure, their physical and chemical properties, how they interact and what role they play in the living world. Examine the science of matter and its motion, as well as space and time, learn about concepts such as force, energy, mass and charge, and understand how the world around us behaves.
     
    How do you learn?
    You will use your existing knowledge of different scientific concepts, compare these with what you find out from books and hands-on experiments and then discuss your findings with your teachers and other students. Through this you will develop your understanding of the ‘big picture’ with regards to the world in which we live.
     
    How are you assessed?
    100% examination, with practical skill question embedded in the examination.
     
    Where will this take me Post-16?
    Studying science will give you an excellent foundation for the largest possible range of further qualifications and careers. A good knowledge of science will mean you could go on to science based subjects like healthcare, engineering, electronics and environmental science. It will also prepare you for all sorts of jobs like law, accountancy or business.
     
    Triple Science
    Triple science is an additional option subject for those who choose to specialise in biology, chemistry and physics. The course provides thorough and in-depth preparation for further study into any area of science at ‘A’-level. Please speak to Mr Tutte or your science teacher for more information.
     
    Why study Triple Science?
    Our world is constantly changing and evolving. There has been a revolution in the way information is stored and accessed, via the web. Due to the demands we make on the planet’s resources and the environment, we need to develop new or alternative solutions for nearly everything we do, from fuel production to waste disposal. By studying science you could have a fascinating and crucial role to play by, for example, designing realistic alternative energy sources, helping people to live more sustainably or discovering new medicines and vaccines for treating diseases. Triple science consolidates and deepens the knowledge and understanding of students across the three science disciplines.
     
    What areas would you study?
    Study the life processes and habits of all living things, from tiny single cells to whole organisms and how they interact with each other and with their environment. Investigate materials in terms of their structure, their physical and chemical properties, how they interact and what role they play in the living world. Examine the science of matter and its motion, as well as space and time. Learn about concepts such as force, energy, mass, and charge, and understand how the world around us behaves.
     
    How do you learn?
    You will develop a wide range of spoken and written communication skills as well as improving your ability to work with others, to analyse and solve problems and to take charge of your own learning. You should also be able to develop your ICT capabilities. These are all important transferable skills that all employers look for.
     
    How are you assessed?
    100% examination, with practical skill question embedded in the examination.
     
    Where will this take me Post-16?
    If you want to follow a career in medicine, veterinary care or dentistry then triple science is definitely for you. Studying science will give you an excellent foundation for the largest possible range of subjects. A good knowledge of science will mean you could go on to science based subjects like engineering, electronics and environmental science. It will also prepare you for all sorts of jobs like law, accountancy or business.
  • Sixth Form
    Physics (AS / A2 Level)

    Examination Board: AQA

    Introduction and Structure: Physics A provides a seamless transition to A Level from previous studies and develops students’ interest and enthusiasm for physics. The two AS theory units provide alternative starting points for the AS course. Unit 1 invites teachers and students to start AS Physics by venturing into the field of Particle Physics and providing a new interest and dimension to their knowledge of the subject. Unit 2 allows progression from GCSE and to develop topics already familiar to their students. At A2, the two A2 theory units present a generally context-free approach to GCE level Physics, as at AS Level, leaving teachers to select the contexts and applications which bring the subject alive. The first unit of the A2 course develops further the knowledge, understanding and applications of Mechanics and Fields. Unit 5 covers Nuclear and Thermal Physics in Section A and provides a choice of optional topics from former Specification A in Section B.

    3.1 Unit 1 PHYA1 Particles, Quantum Phenomena and Electricity

    This unit involves two contrasting topics in physics: particle physics and electricity. Through the study of these topics, students should gain an awareness of the on-going development of new ideas in physics and of the application of in-depth knowledge of well-established topics as electricity. Particle physics introduces students to the fundamental properties and nature of matter, radiation and quantum phenomena. In contrast, the study of electricity in this module builds on and develops previous GCSE studies and provides opportunities for practical work and looks into important applications.

    3.2 Unit 2 PHYA2 Mechanics, Materials and Waves

    This AS unit is about the principles and applications of mechanics, materials and waves. The first section introduces vectors and then develops knowledge and understanding of forces and energy from GCSE Additional Science. In the second section, materials are studied in terms of their bulk properties and tensile strength.

    3.3 Unit 3 Investigative and Practical Skills in AS Physics

    Candidates should carry out experimental and investigative activities in order to develop their practical skills. Experimental and investigative activities should be set in contexts appropriate to, and reflect the demand of, the AS content. These activities should allow candidates to use their knowledge and understanding of Physics in planning, carrying out, analysing and evaluating their work.

    3.4 Unit 4 Fields and Further Mechanics

    The first section advances the study of momentum and introduces circular and oscillatory motion and covers gravitation. Electric and magnetic fields are covered, together with basic electromagnetic induction. Electric fields lead into capacitors and how quickly they charge and discharge through a resistor. Magnetic fields lead into the generation and transmission of alternating current.

    3.5 Unit 5 PHA5A-5D Nuclear Physics, Thermal Physics and an Optional Topic

    This unit consists of two sections. The first part of Section A 'Nuclear and Thermal Physics' looks at the characteristics of the nucleus, the properties of unstable nuclei and how energy is obtained from the nucleus. In the second part of Section A, the thermal properties of materials and the properties and nature of gases are studied in depth. Section B offers an opportunity to study one of the following optional topics to gain deeper understanding and awareness of a selected branch of physics:

    A - Astronomy and cosmology

    B - Medical Physics

    C - Applied Physics

    D - Turning Points in Physics

    3.6 Unit 6 Investigative and Practical Skills in A2 Physics

    Candidates should carry out experimental and investigative activities in order to develop their practical skills. Experimental and investigative activities should be set in contexts appropriate to, and reflect the demand of, the A2 content. These activities should allow candidates to use their knowledge and understanding of Physics in planning, carrying out, analysing and evaluating their work.

    AS Assessment

    Unit 1 – PHYA1 Particles, quantum phenomena and electricity

    Written Examination – (70 marks/120 UMS), 6 or 7 structured questions

    Unit 2 – PHYA2 Mechanics, materials and waves

    Written Examination – (70 marks/120 UMS), 6 or 7 structured questions

    Unit 3 Investigative and practical skills in AS Physics

    PHA3T, Centre Marked Route T – 50 marks

    Practical Skills Assignment (PSA – 9 raw marks)

    Investigative Skills Assignment (ISA – 41 raw marks)

    A2 Assessment

    Unit 4 – PHYA4 Fields and further mechanics

    Section A is 25 multiple choice questions, each worth one mark.

    Section B is a written paper of 4/5 structured questions and consists of 50 marks.

    Unit 5 – One of Units PHA5A, PHA5B, PHA5C, PHA5D

    Section A: Nuclear and Thermal Physics – 40 marks –

    Compulsory section 4/5 structured questions

    Section B: one of the following options.

    Each paper has 4/5 structured questions and 35 marks.

    Options:

    A – Astrophysics

    B – Medical Physics

    C – Applied Physics

    D – Turning Points in Physics

    Unit 6 Investigative and practical skills in A2 Physics

    PHA6T, Centre Marked Route T – 50 marks

    Practical Skills Assessment (PSA – 9 marks)

    Investigative Skills Assignment (ISA – 41 marks)

    Careers:  Physics involves lots of ideas at different levels and different ways of looking at the same problem. Problem solving is a skill all employers want an employee to have.  Studying Physics at A Level allows you to obtain a whole range of other, highly desirable skills; developing practical skills, working with others in a team, writing reports, analysing trends and data, and improved organisational skills to name but a few.  Studying Physics will open up a multitude of career opportunities. Universities and employers take notice of a good grade in A level Physics, more so than certain other subjects. By studying Physics you will advantage yourself in the highly competitive university selection process.

    To find out more about what careers Physics can lead to visit:

    http://www.iop.org/careers/

    Entrance Requirements: Standard entry requirement for entry onto A level programmes of study is 6 GCSE’s at grade C or above. You will need to have either a B grade GCSE in Additional Science or GCSE Physics to study A level Physics.

  • Assessment
  • Enrichment