In This Section

  • Key Stage 3

    The Key Stage 3 science course is condensed into Years 7 and 8. This enables students to start work relevant to GCSE courses in Year 9. As well as the topic content students study skills needed for working scientifically i.e. planning investigations, carrying them out and analysing the results. The pupil learning tasks (PLTs) support this development and are set approximately every half term. 

    Year 7

    Unit

    Topic

    Pupil Learning task

    B1

    B2

    C1

    C2

    P1

    P2

    Cells & reproduction

    Inheritance & interdependence

    Particles & changes

    Acids & rocks

    Energy & electricity 1

    Forces and planets

    Big mums, big babies? Data analysis

    Hunters success – interpreting data

    Water worries – the application of science

    Indigestion remedy - investigation planning

    Nuclear safety – interpreting data

    Skateboarding – investigation planning

    Year 8

    Unit

    Topic

    Pupil Learning task (PLT)

    B3

    B4

    C3

    C4

    P3

    P4

    P5

    P6

    Nutrition & photosynthesis

    Respiration & movement

    Elements & compounds

    Chemical reactions

    Machines

    Energy & electricity 2

    Forces & motion

    Waves

    Breaking up food – investigation plan

    How do we breathe? Application of science

    -

    Making MgO – data analysis

    Investigating moments – planning

    Electromagnet strength – data analysis

    -

    Hearing hopes – application of science

    In addition to extended pupil learning tasks (PLT), students will be expected to complete regular homework tasks based on the topics being taught in lessons. The purpose of these shorter weekly homework tasks in science is to reinforce the skills, knowledge and understanding covered in recent lessons and to provide an opportunity for teacher assessment of students’ learning. They may also be used as an opportunity to extend learning, for example through additional reading. The format of these homework tasks will depend on the material being taught and the skills being practised. Examples of the type of task set includes questions to answer, posters and power points to produce, research using books and/or the internet, revision for tests, learning the spelling and meaning of technical language etc. Worksheets will, wherever possible, be made available on Teams, in the science pupil resources room as are full details of tasks set.

    To reduce the demand for certain types of equipment in lower school, topics are taught to different groups in a different order. On average they will complete just over one topic per half term. At the start of the academic year students will be given the order of topics for their science group. The teacher will also inform them at the beginning of each term which PLT task they will be asked to do. The task will be relevant to that half term’s work.

    Year 9

    In the first term students study a unit of work designed to prepare them for the working scientifically aspects of GCSE. This includes ideas on planning, carrying out and analysing data from investigative work. Students are introduced to the mathematical requirements of the course and carry out work related to these areas.

    In January Year 9 will start working on components of the GCSE course which are relevant to both combined and separate science courses.

  • Key Stage 4

    Double science

    All students will study double science in Year 10 and Year 11. Triple science is also available as an option subject (details below).
     
    Why study science?
    Our world is constantly changing and evolving. There has been a revolution in the way information is stored and accessed, via the web. Due to the demands we make on the planet’s resources and the environment, we need to develop new or alternative solutions for nearly everything we do, from fuel production to waste disposal. By studying science, you could have a fascinating and crucial role to play by, for example, designing realistic alternative energy sources, helping people to live more sustainably or discovering new medicines and vaccines for treating diseases.
     
    What areas would you study?
    Life processes and habits of all living things, from tiny single cells to whole organisms and how they interact with each other and with their environment. You will investigate materials in terms of their structure, their physical and chemical properties, how they interact and what role they play in the living world. You will examine the science of matter and its motion, as well as space and time, learn about concepts such as force, energy, mass and charge, and understand how the world around us behaves.
     
    How do you learn?
    You will use your existing knowledge of different scientific concepts, compare these with what you find out from books and hands-on experiments and then discuss your findings with your teachers and other students. Through this you will develop your understanding of the ‘big picture’ with regards to the world in which we live.
     
    How are you assessed?
    100% examination, with practical skill question embedded in the examination.
     
    Where will this take me post-16?
    Studying science will give you an excellent foundation for the largest possible range of further qualifications and careers. A good knowledge of science will mean you could go on to science based subjects like healthcare, engineering, electronics and environmental science. It will also prepare you for all sorts of jobs like law, accountancy or business.
     

    Triple science

    Triple science is an additional option subject for those who choose to specialise in biology, chemistry and physics. The course provides thorough and in-depth preparation for further study into any area of science at A-level. Triple science consolidates and deepens the knowledge and understanding of students across the three science disciplines.
     
    Where will this take me post-16?
    If you want to follow a career in medicine, veterinary care or dentistry then triple science is definitely for you. Studying science will give you an excellent foundation for the largest possible range of subjects. A good knowledge of science will mean you could go on to science based subjects like engineering, electronics and environmental science. It will also prepare you for all sorts of jobs like law, accountancy or business.
  • GCE Biology

    A-level Biology

    Examination Board: AQA

    Introduction and Structure

    Biology A-level will give you the skills to make connections and associations with all living things around you. Biology literally means the study of life and if that’s not important, what is? Studying biology will give you an opportunity to develop your understanding and knowledge of the natural world. It is a heavyweight subject that is sure to impress universities and potential employers. Being such a broad topic, you’re bound to find a specific area of interest, plus it opens the door to a fantastic range of interesting careers. 

    Core Content

    • biological molecules
    • cells
    • organisms exchange substances with their environment
    • genetic information, variation and relationships between organisms
    • energy transfers in and between organisms
    • organisms respond to changes in their internal and external environments
    • genetics, populations, evolution and ecosystems
    • the control of gene expression

    Paper 1: written examination 2 hours/91 marks/35% of total qualification

    Paper 2: written examination 2 hours/91 marks/35% of total qualification

    Paper 3: written examination 2 hours/78 marks/30% of total qualification

    Careers and Progression

    A-level biology opens the doors to a diverse range of higher degree courses and careers such as medicine, nursing, veterinary science, physiotherapy, midwifery, occupational therapy, biochemistry, zoology, environmental science, dentistry, bioinformatics, bioengineering and radiography.

    Entrance Requirements

    Minimum requirement: 6 GCSEs Grades 9-4 (or equivalent), including Grade 4 or above in English and maths

    Strongly recommended: Grade 5 in maths

    Recommended: Grade 5 in biology

  • GCE Chemistry

    A-level Chemistry

    Examination Board: AQA

    Introduction and Structure

    A-level chemistry offers students an opportunity to develop their interest in, and enthusiasm for chemistry, including developing an interest in further study and careers in chemistry. It encourages them to appreciate how society makes decisions about scientific issues and how the sciences contribute to the success of the economy and society. Students develop and demonstrate a deeper appreciation of the skills, knowledge and understanding of how science works. It is a course highly regarded by universities for the depth of knowledge and breadth of skills which students develop. Chemistry is an experimental science. At Taverham we develop both theory and practical skills through dynamic teaching, rigorous assessment and effective intervention to achieve the very best for our students. 

    Core Content

    • physical chemistry: atomic structure; amount of substance; bonding; energetics; kinetics chemical equilibria, le Chatelier’s principle and Kc; oxidation, reduction and redox equations; thermodynamics; rate equations; equilibrium constant Kp for homogeneous systems; electrode potentials and electrochemical cells; acids and bases
    • inorganic chemistry: periodicity; alkaline earth metals; halogens; Period 3 elements and their oxides; transition metals; reactions of ions in aqueous solution
    • organic chemistry: alkanes; halogenoalkanes; alkenes; alcohols; organic analysis; optical isomerism; aldehydes and ketones; carboxylic acids and derivatives; aromatic chemistry; amines; polymers; amino acids, proteins and DNA; organic synthesis; nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; chromatography

    Paper 1: written examination 2 hours/105 marks/35% of total qualification

    Paper 2: written examination 2 hours/105 marks/35% of total qualification

    Paper 3: written examination 2 hours/90 marks/30% of total qualification

    Careers and Progression

    Chemistry combines well with biology, physics, maths and geography and can lead to over 65 different university courses covering medicine, dentistry, medical sciences, material and engineering sciences and enviromental and geological sciences.

    Entrance Requirements

    Minimum requirement: 6 GCSEs Grades 9-4 (or equivalent), including Grade 4 or above in English and maths

    Strongly recommended: Grade 5 in maths

    Recommended: Grade 5 in chemistry

  • GCE Physics

    A-level Physics

    Examination Board: AQA

    Introduction and Structure

    Physics A-level provides a seamless transition from previous studies and develops students’ interest and enthusiasm for physics. By studying physics you're opening the door to a wide variety of rewarding careers. As well as learning about how the universe works, you'll gain a broad training in skills that all employers value: an ability to grasp concepts quickly and a determination to find coherent answers; problem-solving, analytical, mathematical and IT skills. Even if you don't end up working in a physics-related industry, these skills are still highly regarded. Studying physics is a good way of keeping your options open and earning a good salary.

    Core Content

    • measurements and their errors
    • particles and radiation
    • waves
    • mechanics and materials
    • electricity
    • further mechanics and thermal physics
    • fields and their consequences
    • nuclear physics

    Options

    • astrophysics
    • medical physics
    • engineering physics
    • turning points in physics
    • electronics

    Paper 1: written examination 2 hours/85 marks/34% of total qualification

    Paper 2: written examination 2 hours/85 marks/34% of total qualification

    Paper 3: written examination 2 hours/80 marks/32% of total qualification

    Careers and Progression

    Most students will go on to study degrees in engineering, physics or other science-related areas. Studying physics will open up a multitude of career opportunities. Universities and employers take notice of a good grade in A-level physics, more so than certain other subjects. By studying physics you will advantage yourself in the highly competitive university selection process. To find out more about what careers physics can lead to visit http://www.iop.org/careers/

    Entrance Requirements

    Minimum requirement: 6 GCSEs Grades 9-4 (or equivalent), including Grade 4 or above in English and maths

    Strongly recommended: Grade 5 in maths

    Recommended: Grade 5 in physics