• Key Stage 3
  • Key Stage 4
  • English Literature A-level
  • English Language A-level
 
  • Year 7

    All units are themed around 'the world around us' to include childhood and the environment

    Autumn 1: novel study

    Freak the Mighty by Rodman Philbrick or Wonder by RJ Polacio

    Autumn 2: creative writing

    Creating characters and openings within the hero and villain genre     

    Spring 1: poetry study

    A range of poetry from across the 20th and 21st centuries that explore the theme of childhood

    Spring 2: transactional writing

    Speech writing around issues to do with the world around us and a focus on the environment     

    Summer 1 and Summer 2

    Shakespeare study of A Midsummer Night's Dream

    Year 8

    All units are themed around the idea of marginalisation and discrimination

    Autumn 1: novel study

    The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne or Noughts and Crosses by Malorie Blackman     

    Autumn 2: creative writing

    Writing in the dystopian genre

    Spring 1: poetry study

    A range of poetry from across the 19th to 21st centuries that explore marginalisation and discrimination

    Spring 2 - transactional writing

    Article writing around issues to do with marginalisation, discrimination, and prejudice

    Summer 1 and Summer 2

    Shakespeare study of Romeo and Juliet or The Merchant of Venice      

    Year 9

    All units are themed around the topic of gender    

    Autumn 1: novel study

    The Lord of the Flies by William Golding or Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

    Autumn 2: creative writing

    An introduction to English Language Paper 1, using extracts that explore gender

    Spring 1: poetry study

    A selection of poetry from the Love and Relationships cluster of the GCSE paper

    Spring 2: transactional writing

    An introduction to the English Language Paper 2, using extracts that explore gender

    Summer 1 and Summer 2    

    An "across time" study of how women and witches have been presented in literature from ancient texts such as Circe to modern day texts such as Harry Potter 

  • GCSE English Language/English Literature

    There are two separate qualifications offered as part of the core subject of English: English Language and English Literature. Most students are entered for both qualifications, although those students who may find it difficult will be given the opportunity to be assessed for English Language as a single qualification.
     
    Where will this take me post-16?
    English is a requirement for the vast majority of post-16 courses and employers look for it too. Having a GCSE in English will help you in all career paths in the future. Want to take it further? English and literature can help you towards a career in the legal profession, broadcasting (film, TV and radio), publishing, journalism, marketing, editorial work, public relations, copywriting, library work, acting, translating, TV or theatre directing, advisory work and teaching, to name a few.
     
    English Language
    Why study English?
    Being coherent both in written and verbal form is vital for success in the modern world. In many aspects of everyday life, English plays an important role, whether it’s reading a magazine article, creating your CV or writing a letter to a future employer. Being able to communicate effectively is an essential part of your progress in the adult world.
     
    What areas would you study?
    The examination will consist of two papers; Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing and Writers’ Viewpoints and Perspectives. You will develop writing skills, including writing for a range of purposes and audiences in a variety of styles. Throughout the two-year course you will explore a variety of non-fiction and media texts from the real world, such as newspaper articles, websites, leaflets, advertisements and letters. As part of the second paper students are assessed on ability to make comparisons between 19th century texts and modern texts so you will be working with a range of texts from different time periods.
     
    How do you learn?
    You will read a range of texts which you will analyse and compare with texts from different genres and time periods. Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences is important and you will research, plan and re-draft texts to improve your understanding. The development of speaking and listening skills is encouraged so that you can communicate through different situations, such as individual presentations, pair tasks and group work. Speaking and Listening is assessed as an individual component and will be prepared in class. 
     
    How are you assessed?
    Examination 100%
     
    English Literature
    Why study English Literature?
    English Literature broadens your mind as you read and explore the experiences of a range of authors. It allows you to develop the ability to interpret writers' techniques, improve your independent learning skills, and read for deeper meanings within the context of the novel.
     
    What areas would you study?
    There are two papers for the literature GCSE. Paper 1 is Shakespeare and the 19th century novel and Paper 2 is Modern Texts and Poetry. Throughout the course you will study one Shakespeare play and a 19th-century novel where you will develop the ability to appreciate and interpret authors' language choices and techniques and how social, historical and cultural contexts affect the overall meaning of the text. You will also study a collection of poetry from the Power and Conflict cluster alongside various unseen poems. The final text studied is a modern classic, An Inspector Calls by JB Priestley.
     
    How do you learn?
    You will read a range of texts which you will analyse and compare with texts from different genres and time periods. Class discussion and independent study are vital to explore the many aspects of literature. 
     
    How are you assessed?
    Examination 100%
  • English Literature A-level

    Examination Board: Edexcel

    Introduction and Structure

    A-level in English literature enables you to engage critically and creatively with a wide range of texts, whilst developing your knowledge of literary analysis and evaluation. You will study eight literary texts plus unseen poetry. It is expected that you will purchase your own copies of the set texts to use throughout the course. There will be a great deal of reading as preparation for discussion work in lessons, so you must have constant access to the texts.

    Assessment

    Component 1: Drama

    You will study Othello by William Shakespeare alongside an anthology of critical essays. This is followed by the study of A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams.

    Written examination 2 hours 15 minutes/60 marks/30% of total qualification

    Component 2: Prose

    You will study two prose texts: Frankenstein by Mary Shelley and The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells to explore and compare the way they present science and society.

    Written examination 1 hour/40 marks/20% of total qualification

    Component 3: Poetry

    You will study poetic form, meaning and language including a selection of post 2000 specified poetry from Forward’s Poems of the Decade, and The Wife of Bath’s Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer.

    Written examination 2 hours 15 minutes/60 marks/30% of total qualification

    Component 4: non exam assessment

    In class you will study The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood. Once study of this text is complete, you will choose a text to compare to The Handmaid’s Tale and generate your own question to compare and explore the links between the two texts.

    Internally assessed, externally moderated/60 marks/20 % of qualification

    Careers and Progression

    The course is known as a facilitating subject which prepares students for future study in literature and supports other studies in the arts and humanities. Students have gone on to successful careers in television, law, accountancy, business and teaching.

    Entrance Requirements

    Minimum requirement: 6 GCSEs Grades 9-4 (or equivalent), including Grade 4 or above in English and maths

    Strongly recommended: Grade 5 in English literature

  • English Language A-level

    Examination Board: AQA

    Introduction and Structure

    English language at A-level is a broad, engaging and stimulating course where you will learn a wide range of new concepts and skills. It enables you to explore in-depth the study of language and how it is used to communicate meaning.

    Assessment

    Component 1: language variation

    • how language varies depending on mode, field, function and audience
    • how language choices can create personal identities
    • language variation in English from c1550 (the beginnings of early modern English) to the present day

    Written examination 2 hours 15 minutes/60 marks/35% of total qualification

    Component 2: child language

    • spoken language acquisition and how children learn to write between the ages of 0 and 8
    • the relationship between spoken language acquisition and literacy skills that children are taught, including the beginnings of reading
    • appropriate theories of children’s language development

    Written examination 1 hour/45 marks/20% of total qualification

    Component 3: investigating language

    You will:

    • select a research focus from five topic areas
    • develop research and investigation skills
    • undertake a focused investigation
    • apply your knowledge of language levels and key language concepts developed through the whole course
    • develop your personal language specialism

    Written examination 1 hour 45 minutes/45 marks/25% of total qualification

    Component 4: coursework - crafting language

    You will

    • research a selected genre
    • demonstrate your skills as a writer within your selected genre, crafting texts for different audiences and/or purposes
    • reflect on your research and writing in an accompanying commentary

    Two assignments internally assessed and externally moderated. 50 marks/20% of total qualification

    Careers and Progression

    The course prepares you for future study in language, linguistics and supports other studies in the arts and humanities.

    Entrance Requirements

    Minimum requirement: 6 GCSEs Grades 9-4 (or equivalent), including Grade 4 or above in English and maths

    Strongly recommended: Grade 5 in English language